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Landscape, Ukiyo-e, and Haiku (Grade 4)

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Miguel Diaz
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Landscape, Ukiyo-e, and Haiku (Grade 4)

USC US China Institute Curriculum Project – 4th Grade

Miguel Diaz

 

Rationale for the Proposed Curriculum Unit

 

The proposed curriculum unit includes the reading of a short, grade appropriate chapter books, the study and appreciation of Japanese woodblock printing (Ukiyo-e), and the appreciation and creation of haiku poetry. Students in grade 4 are required to read challenging chapter books. They are also required to understand and appreciate various forms of visual arts. Finally, students in grade 4 need to be familiar with various forms of poetry by the end of the year.

I will teach a series of three related lessons in this unit in order to give my students a deeper understanding of Japan. I do so in the hopes that my students will learn to get a different perspective and worldview from the one they currently hold. 

Skills and Content Objectives

A. The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck

My students will read The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck to appreciate and understand the book as a whole, however, a special emphasis will be placed on understanding the settings as described by the author. The students will use their understanding of settings in order to choose one from which they will draw a picture in the style of the Ukiyo-e genre.

B. Woodblock Printing (Ukiyo-e)

My students will not actually attempt to re-create woodblock printings, instead, they will use crayons and/or acrylic paints to imitate the style of the artist Hokusai.

C. Haiku Poetry

My students will learn about and write haiku poetry. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Detailed Lesson Plans

PART I 

(7-10 Days): Read the complete chapter book titled The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck

 

Lesson Plan

Subject(s):

Language Arts

Grade Level(s)

4th

Date:

06/09/2021

Common Core Standard(s)

Language Arts

3. Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character’s thoughts, words, or actions). 

7. Make connections between the text of a story or drama and a visual or oral presentation of the text, identifying where each version reflects specific descriptions and directions in the text.

 

Single/Multi-Day Lesson:

7-10 days

 

 

   I. DESCRIPTION OF CONTENT & CONTENT TYPE (Fact, Procedure, Concept, Or Principle):

Analyze The various landscape settings presented in The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck.

 

II. LEARNING OUTCOME (Objective):

1) To understand and appreciate rustic landscapes as presented by the use of an author’s words.

2) To transform setting descriptions from words to visual representations.

3) To create a work of art that was inspired and influenced by both The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck and by the “Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji” by Katsushika Hokusai.

 

 

III. REGULAR CONNECTION (How This Lesson Fits into Unit Plan):

 

This lesson plan is part of a three-part integrated series of lesson plans. 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III. CURRICULUM CONNECTION (How This Lesson Fits into Unit Plan):

 

Social Studies 

Japan

IV. INSTRUCTION

 

A. ENGAGEMENT (Motivational Activity):

  • The teacher will state the learning objectives.

 

1. The teacher will begin the lesson by showing the following questions on the screen, and by asking the questions as well:

 

  • What is a setting description? 
  • What is a landscape description?

 

2. The teacher will ask each question one at a time. Likewise, the teacher will ask the students to think about the answer to each question one at a time, and the students will be asked to share their answers with their neighbors. 

 

3. The teacher will then ask for students to volunteer answers for questions 1 to 2 above so that the entire class can listen to their answers.

 

 

B. INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE (Teaching Methodology with Student Activities):

 

1. The teacher will complete a bubble map on the board which will show the students’ responses to the questions in section (A).

 

2. The teacher will write students’ responses on the bubble map.

 

3. The teacher will then explain the meaning of detailed setting descriptions and landscapes.

 

C. APPLICATION ACTIVITY (Practice and Or Reflection):

The application activity for this lesson involves the creation of student produced simple sketches which were inspired by setting descriptions in the book. 

 

D. MATERIALS AND RESOURCES:

For this online lesson, the teacher will need a computer, access to Zoom video conferencing software, an app called Notability, a Wacom digital writing tablet, headphones, and a digital copy of The Big Wave.

 

 

 

V. ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES (Methods for Obtaining Evidence of Learning):

 

1. The teacher will conduct both formative and submit of assessments during this lesson
2. The teacher will check for understanding as the students create their basis sketches.

3. The teacher will ask the students to compare their sketches against the descriptions in the book. 

4. At the end of class the teacher will ask the students to repeat the learning objectives.

5. At the end of class the teacher will ask the students to restate/summarize the lesson’s objective’s.

 

VI. ACCOMMODATIONS FOR INDIVIDUAL LEARNERS (CONTENT INSTRUCTION, PRACTICE):

 

In order to scaffold the lesson, and to differentiate for learners of different abilities, the teacher will do as follows:

 

1. Explain key vocabulary words after the engagement activities.

2. Include easy words in all explanations in order to meet the needs of struggling learners.

3. Include challenging words in all explanations in order to meet the needs of advanced learners.

4. Target various learning intelligences such as the bodily-kinesthetic, linguistic, and musical.

5. Include audio-video materials in order to make the lesson accessible to struggling learners.

6. Make use of pair work in order to allow students to explain items and concepts to each other. 

VII. HOMEWORK IF (APPROPRIATE):

 

No homework will be assigned for this assignment; However, students will be encouraged reread The Big Wave in order to get a better appreciation of the landscapes presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART II 

(1-2 Days): “Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji” by Katsushika Hokusai

 

Lesson Plan

Subject(s):

Visual Arts

Grade Level(s)

4th

Date:

06/09/2021

Common Core Standard(s)

Visual Arts

2: Organize and Develop Artistic Ideas and Work 

Create personally satisfying artwork using a variety of artistic processes and materials.

Single/Multi-Day Lesson:

1-2 days

 

 

   I. DESCRIPTION OF CONTENT & CONTENT TYPE (Fact, Procedure, Concept, Or Principle):

Analyze the “Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji” by Katsushika Hokusai. Produce a work of art that was influenced by one of the 36 views and by The Big Wave.

 

II. LEARNING OUTCOME (Objective):

1) To understand and appreciate Ukiyo-e woodblock printing and the aesthetics of the genre.

 

2) To analyze the “Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji” by Katsushika Hokusai.

 

3) To create a work of art that was inspired and influenced by both The Big Wave by Pearl S. Buck and the “Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji” by Katsushika Hokusai.

 

 

III. REGULAR CONNECTION (How This Lesson Fits into Unit Plan):

 

This lesson plan is part of a three-part integrated series of lesson plans. 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III. CURRICULUM CONNECTION (How This Lesson Fits into Unit Plan):

 

Social Studies 

Japan

IV. INSTRUCTION

 

A. ENGAGEMENT (Motivational Activity):

  • The teacher will state the learning objectives.

 

1. The teacher will begin the lesson by showing the following questions on the screen, and by asking the questions as well:

 

  • What is woodblock printing? 
  • What is Ukiyo-e?
  • What is Mt. Fuji?

 

2. The teacher will ask each question one at a time. Likewise, the teacher will ask the students to think about the answer to each question one at a time, and the students will be asked to share their answers with their neighbors. 

 

3. The teacher will then ask for students to volunteer answers for questions 1 to 3 above so that the entire class can listen to their answers.

 

 

B. INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE (Teaching Methodology with Student Activities):

 

1. The teacher will complete a bubble map on the board which will show the students’ responses to the questions in section (A).

 

2. The teacher will write students’ responses on the bubble map.

 

3. The teacher will then explain the meaning of woodblock printing, Ukiyo-e, and Mt. Fuji.

 

The brief explanation will be followed by YouTube videos. The students will watch the videos in order to conceptualize their own artistic renditions of scenes in book called The Big Wave.

 

“Thirty-Six Views of Mt. Fuji” by Katsushika Hokusai

https://youtu.be/d2dqtcu2NN8

https://youtu.be/u8OHy5jT__M

 

Ukiyo-e Woodblock Printing

https://youtu.be/t8uF3PZ3KGQ

 

 

C. APPLICATION ACTIVITY (Practice and Or Reflection):

The application activity for this lesson involves the creation of student produced drawings which were inspired in part by Ukiyo-e. The students will be given 60 minutes of independent time in order to produce their works of art.  At the end of the session, the students will be given the opportunity to share their artwork with the rest of the class. 

 

D. MATERIALS AND RESOURCES:

For this online lesson, the teacher will need a computer, access to Zoom video conferencing software, an app called Notability, a Wacom digital writing tablet, headphones, three short YouTube videos (listed above). The students will need a computer (or an iPad), access to Zoom video conferencing software, writing paper, pens colored pencils, or acrylic paints.

 

 

V. ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES (Methods for Obtaining Evidence of Learning):

 

1. The teacher will conduct both formative and submit of assessments during this lesson
2. The teacher will check for understanding as the students create their Ukiyo-e inspired artwork.

3. The teacher will ask the students to compare their artwork against the given examples. 

4. The teacher will collect all the artwork at the end of class in order to provide the students with written feedback. 

5. At the end of class the teacher will ask the students to repeat the learning objectives.

6. At the end of class the teacher will ask the students to restate/summarize the elements of a Ukiyo-e.

 

VI. ACCOMMODATIONS FOR INDIVIDUAL LEARNERS (CONTENT INSTRUCTION, PRACTICE):

 

In order to scaffold the lesson, and to differentiate for learners of different abilities, the teacher will do as follows:

 

1. Explain key vocabulary words after the engagement activities.

2. Include easy words in all explanations in order to meet the needs of struggling learners.

3. Include challenging words in all explanations in order to meet the needs of advanced learners.

4. Target various learning intelligences such as the bodily-kinesthetic, linguistic, and musical.

5. Include audio-video materials in order to make the lesson accessible to struggling learners.

6. Make use of pair work in order to allow students to explain items and concepts to each other. 

VII. HOMEWORK IF (APPROPRIATE):

 

No homework will be assigned for this assignment; However, students will be encouraged conduct further research online on Ukiyo-e.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PART III 

(1-2 Days): Haiku Poetry

 

 

Lesson Plan

Subject(s):

English Language Arts/Writing

(Poetry)

Grade Level(s)

4th

Date:

06/09/2021

Common Core Standard(s)

Reading Language Arts/Writing (Poetry)

 

 

10. By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, in the grades 4–5 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. 

 

Single/Multi-Day Lesson:

1-2 days

 

 

I. DESCRIPTION OF CONTENT & CONTENT TYPE (Fact, Procedure, Concept, Or Principle):

To identify/analyze a haiku poem. To learn to write/produce a haiku poem.

 

 

II. LEARNING OUTCOME (Objective):

1) To understand the difference between poetry, prose and drama

 

2) To analyze several haiku poems and to identify their specific elements.

 

3) To compose a haiku poem which includes the following elements:

 

·       three lines

·       17 total syllables/beats [line 1 has five beats, line 2 has seven beats, and line three has five beats] 5-7-5

·       present tense verbs

·       includes a season or time of year

·       shows respect for nature

 

III. REGULAR CONNECTION (How This Lesson Fits into Unit Plan):

 

This lesson plan fits in the long-term goal which states that students need to learn to distinguish common forms of literature (e.g., poetry, drama, fiction, nonfiction).


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

III. CURRICULUM CONNECTION (How This Lesson Fits into Unit Plan):

 

Social Studies 

Japan

IV. INSTRUCTION

 

A. ENGAGEMENT (Motivational Activity):

  • The teacher will state the learning objectives.
  • Volunteers will be asked to read the learning objectives from the computer screen.

 

1. The teacher will begin the lesson by showing the following questions on the screen, and by asking the questions as well:

 

  • What is poetry? 
  • What do you know about poetry?
  • How is poetry different from other types of writing? 

 

2. The teacher will ask each question one at a time. Likewise, the teacher will ask the students to think about the answer to each question one at a time, and the students will be asked to share their answers with their neighbors. 

 

3. The teacher will then ask for students to volunteer answers for questions 1 to 3 above so that the entire class can listen to their answers.

 

 

B. INSTRUCTIONAL SEQUENCE (Teaching Methodology with Student Activities):

 

1. The teacher will complete a bubble map on the board which will show the students’ responses to the questions in section (A).

 

2. The teacher will write students’ responses on the bubble map.

 

3. The teacher will then explain the meaning and the elements of haiku poetry, and will follow these with several examples of haiku poems. The students will analyze each poem. The students will be questioned and monitored for understanding. Students will watch a short video clip on haiku poetry. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2NE4a3NxUw

 

4. A haiku poem needs to include the following:

 

·       three lines

·       17 total syllables/beats [line 1 has five beats, line 2 has seven beats, and line three has five beats] 5-7-5

·       present tense verbs

·       includes a season or time of year

·       shows respect for nature

 

C. APPLICATION ACTIVITY (Practice and Or Reflection):

The application activity for this lesson involves the creation of student produced haiku poems. The students will be given 30 minutes of independent writing time in order to produce their haiku poems.  At the end of the writing, the students will be given the opportunity to share their poems with the rest of the class. 

 

D. MATERIALS AND RESOURCES:

For this online lesson, the teacher will need a computer, access to Zoom video conferencing software, an app called Notability, a Wacom digital writing tablet, headphones, a digital Haiku writing worksheet, a digital bubble map, a short 2-minute YouTube video, and a digital version of a book called Read, Recite, and Write Haiku (Poet's Workshop). The students will need a computer (or an iPad), access to Zoom video conferencing software, writing paper, and a pen or pencil.

 

 

V. ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES (Methods for Obtaining Evidence of Learning):

 

1. The teacher will conduct both formative and submit of assessments during this lesson
2. The teacher will check for understanding when presenting examples of haiku poetry, specifically when discussing the unique elements of haiku poetry.

3. The teacher will ask the students to compare their haiku poems against a standard example which will appear on the screen.

4. The teacher will collect all the poems at the end of class in order to provide the students with written feedback. 

5. At the end of class the teacher will ask the students to repeat the learning objectives.

6. At the end of class the teacher will ask the students to restate/summarize the elements of a haiku poem.

 

VI. ACCOMMODATIONS FOR INDIVIDUAL LEARNERS (CONTENT INSTRUCTION, PRACTICE):

 

In order to scaffold the lesson, and to differentiate for learners of different abilities, the teacher will do as follows:

 

1. Explain key vocabulary words after the engagement activities.

2. Include easy words in all explanations in order to meet the needs of struggling learners.

3. Include challenging words in all explanations in order to meet the needs of advanced learners.

4. Target various learning intelligences such as the bodily-kinesthetic, linguistic, and musical.

5. Include audio-video materials in order to make the lesson accessible to struggling learners.

6. Make use of pair work in order to allow students to explain items and concepts to each other. 

VII. HOMEWORK IF (APPROPRIATE):

 

No homework will be assigned for this assignment; However, students will be encouraged to check out the book which was used for this lesson from the library.