You are here

Congressional Research Service, Hong Kong’s Proposed Extradition Law Amendments, August 14, 2019

This non-partisan Congressional Research Service backgrounder was written by Michael F. Martin. The report notes that the key amendment is to establish procedures for extradition to mainland China, to Macau and to Taiwan. The changes also reduce the number of crimes for which extradition is possible and requires that the possible sentence be for at least three years.

August 14, 2019
Print

The full 2 page background report is available for download here. It begins:

Two proposed changes to Hong Kong’s extradition law have sparked over two months of massive demonstrations across the city. If adopted, the changes could make anyone—including U.S. citizens—residing in, visiting, or transiting the Hong Kong Special Administrative District (HKSAR) vulnerable to investigation by or extradition to mainland China, raising concerns about possible political prosecutions

On April 3, 2019, Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor submitted to the city’s Legislative Council (Legco) proposed amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance(FOO) that would permit—for the first time—extradition of alleged criminals from Hong Kong to mainland China, the Macau Special Administrative Region(Macau), and Taiwan. In addition, the legislation seeks to amend its Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters Ordinance (MLAO) to include mainland China, Macau, and Taiwan.

 

Print

Links

Events

April 9, 2020 - 4:00pm

Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute for an online talk with Julia Strauss on her new book, which focuses on the period 1949 to 1954 and compares how the Communist Party in China and the Nationalist Party in Taiwan sought to consolidate their authority and foster economic development.

April 16, 2020 - 4:00pm

The USC U.S.-China institute presents a webcast with award-winning journalist Dexter Robert. His new book explores the reality behind today’s financially-ascendant China and pulls the curtain back on how the Chinese manufacturing machine is actually powered.