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Documents - US-Asia

Address by President Gerald R. Ford at the University of Hawaii, December 7, 1975

December 7, 1975

President Ford's speech at the University of Hawaii after returning from his trip to China. Excerpted from the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library & Museum.

Tonkin Gulf Resolution, August 7, 1964

January 7, 1964

The Tonkin Gulf Resolution is of historical significance because it gave U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson authorization, without a formal declaration of war by Congress, for the use of conventional military force in Southeast Asia. Specifically, the resolution authorized the President to do whatever necessary in order to assist "any member or protocol state of the Southeast Asia Collective Defense Treaty." This included involving armed forces.

Armistice Agreement for the Restoration of the South Korean State July 27, 1953

July 27, 1953

The Armistice Agreement for the Restoration of the South Korean State formally ended the war in Korea.

Treaty of Peace with Japan, 1951

September 8, 1951

Treaty of Peace with Japan, Sept. 8, 1951, San Francisco, California, USA

Instrument of Surrender by Japan, 1945

September 2, 1945

Instrument of Surrender by Japan, September 2, 1945, Tokyo Bay

Japanese Note to the United States ("Fourteen Part Message"), 1941

December 7, 1941

Japanese Note to the United States, December 7, 1941,(Generally referred to as the "Fourteen Part Message.")

Message From the United States President to the Emperor of Japan, 1941

December 6, 1941

One day before the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor with 420 airplanes, President Franklin D. Roosevelt sent the following message to the Showa Emperor of Japan.

United States Note to Japan, 1941

November 26, 1941

The text of the document handed by the Secretary of State to the Japanese Ambassador on November 26, 1941, which consists of two parts, one an oral statement and one an outline of a proposed basis for agreement between the United States and Japan.

U.S. Senator Albert J. Beveridge speaks on the Philippine Question, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C., January 9, 1900

December 13, 1901

Senator Beveridge's speech on the Philippines reflects an era of American imperialism in the Pacific.

The White Man's Burden 1899

December 13, 1901

"The White Man's Burden" is a poem by the English poet Rudyard Kipling. It was originally published in the popular magazine McClure's in 1899. It was a response to the U.S. taking over the Philippines after the Spanish-American War. Although Kipling's poem mixed exhortation to empire with sober warnings of the costs involved, imperialists within the United States understood the phrase "white man's burden" as a characterization for imperialism that justified the policy as a noble enterprise.

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Events

July 2, 2020 - 4:00pm

The USC U.S.-China Institute presents a webinar with David Zweig to look at how tensions between the United States and China have impacted scientific collaboration and research.  

July 16, 2020 - 4:00pm

Bob Davis and Lingling Wei, authors of Superpower Showdown, will help us understand the ramp up of US-China economic tensions and the far-reaching consequences of the stand-off.