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Past Events

Past Events

October 17, 2019 - 6:00pm
Los Angeles, California

“DAWN OF A NEW DAY: ASIAN AMERICAN WOMEN WHO ARE CHANGING MEDIA,” is a panel of Asian American women in film/tv/media that promotes social change with their work. This panel of fierce female leaders, storytellers, and activists who have challenged a predominantly male-dominated industry will be moderated by Ada Tseng of LA Times. Panelists include Actress Tess Paras, writer Fawzia Mirza, performance artist Kristina Wong, and director Grace Lee.

October 12, 2019 - 10:30am
New York, New York

Due to the success of our meditation course last year in New York, Bruce will be teaching a full day course on Meditation!  Using inner dissolving and methods from the classic Daoist text the “Yi Jing” or Book of Changes, this course will show you ways for how to better deal with the changes of life. Enabling you to better emotionally and mentally adapt in your personal, professional and financial relationships, as well as to the realities of our rapidly, changing technological and climate changing world.

October 10, 2019 - 4:30pm
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Is the process of state building a unilateral, national venture, or is it something more collaborative, taking place in the interstices between adjoining countries? To answer this question, this book takes a comparative look at the state building process along China, Myanmar, and Thailand's common borderland area. It shows that the variations in state building among these neighboring countries are the result of an interactive process that occurs across national boundaries. Departing from existing approaches that look at such processes from the angle of singular, bounded territorial states, the book argues that a more fruitful method is to examine how state and nation building in one country can influence, and be influenced by, the same processes across borders. It argues that the success or failure of one country's state building is a process that extends beyond domestic factors such as war preparation, political institutions, and geographic and demographic variables. Rather, it shows that we should conceptualize state building as an interactive process heavily influenced by a "neighborhood effect." Furthermore, the book moves beyond the academic boundaries that divide arbitrarily China studies and Southeast Asian studies by providing an analysis that ties the state and nation building processes in China with those of Southeast Asia.

October 10, 2019 - 4:30pm
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Is the process of state building a unilateral, national venture, or is it something more collaborative, taking place in the interstices between adjoining countries? To answer this question, this book takes a comparative look at the state building process along China, Myanmar, and Thailand's common borderland area. It shows that the variations in state building among these neighboring countries are the result of an interactive process that occurs across national boundaries. Departing from existing approaches that look at such processes from the angle of singular, bounded territorial states, the book argues that a more fruitful method is to examine how state and nation building in one country can influence, and be influenced by, the same processes across borders. It argues that the success or failure of one country's state building is a process that extends beyond domestic factors such as war preparation, political institutions, and geographic and demographic variables. Rather, it shows that we should conceptualize state building as an interactive process heavily influenced by a "neighborhood effect." Furthermore, the book moves beyond the academic boundaries that divide arbitrarily China studies and Southeast Asian studies by providing an analysis that ties the state and nation building processes in China with those of Southeast Asia.

October 10, 2019 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

Please join us for a screening of the 2015 documentary A Purpose Built School by filmmaker Jia Ding, followed by a discussion with the director. 

October 10, 2019 - 3:30pm
Washington, DC, District of Columbia

In her new and timely book, Rebecca Fannin sets out to correct and update perceptions about China’s now booming technological sector. By chronicling its dramatic rise and zeroing in on the most striking success stories, Fannin lays out the players and their strategies as they trailblaze China’s technological quest. She also predicts what lies ahead for China’s innovative power in the next 10 years, and what China’s technological ascent means for the United States and its future global leadership.

Her remarks will be followed by questions from the audience and commentaries from Craig Allen and David Dollar.

Copies of the book will be available for purchase at the event.

October 9, 2019 - 5:00pm
Washington, DC, District of Columbia

What explains China’s distinctive approach to economic statecraft? When is China’s economic statecraft most effective, and what can the China case tell us about economic statecraft more broadly? Dr. Reilly will engage these questions by drawing upon his current book manuscript. Tracing the ideas and institutions at the heart of the ‘China model’ of economic statecraft, he will look at two most-likely cases for success – Myanmar and North Korea – as well as examine a set of least-likely cases, comparing China’s economic statecraft in Western Europe with Central and Eastern Europe, and assessing Beijing’s impact upon European policy decisions. By examining how China uses economic resources to exert influence abroad, identifying when Beijing is most effective, and exploring the domestic drivers of China’s economic statecraft, Dr. Reilly hopes to help launch a new research field: the comparative study of economic statecraft.

October 8, 2019 - 4:00pm
Berkeley, California

Many commentators claim that China's ongoing global rise reflects a restoration of its earlier international prominence, while others highlight that China's emergence reflects distinctive characteristics of the country's current political leadership. In his new book, Making China Modern, Klaus Mühlhahn of the Free University of Berlin provides a panoramic survey of China's rise and resilience through war and rebellion, disease and famine.

October 8, 2019 - 12:00pm
Ann Arbor, Michigan

Over the past decade, a wave of Chinese international undergraduate students―mostly self-funded―has swept across American higher education. This privileged yet diverse group of young people from a changing China must navigate the complications and confusions of their formative years while bridging the two most powerful countries in the world. How do these students come to study in the United States? What does this experience mean to them? This talk is based on a forthcoming book to be released by the Columbia University Press in January 2020.

October 7, 2019 - 12:30pm
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

This presentation examines how goods from outside of China were sent over this border via two channels: items carried by travelers, including overseas Chinese and Hong Kong/Macao “compatriots,” and items shipped in “small packets,” the system that emerged to replace parcel post.  A steady stream of goods from the outside went over the bamboo curtain, but during the famine that followed China’s Great Leap Forward, such individual packages became a flood.  Using archives, newspapers, and oral history collections, this presentation explores the meaning and significance of cross-border ties.

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