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Noble Tombs at Mawangdui: Art and Life in the Changsha Kingdom, Third Century BCE to First Century

An exhibit featuring treasures of the Marquis of the Changsha Kingdom and his family

When:
February 12, 2009 12:00am to June 7, 2009 12:00am
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In the 1970s, archaeologists in China’s Hunan Province unearthed three tombs dating back to the early Han Dynasty (206 BCE – 24 CE) containing the remains and possessions of the Marquis of the Changsha Kingdom and his family. Over 3,000 cultural relics reflecting the opulent life of this noble family were recovered from the site. On view at China Institute Gallery from February 12 through June 7, 2009, Noble Tombs at Mawangdui: Art and Life in the Changsha Kingdom, Third Century BCE to First Century CE will present 68 treasures including silk costumes, wood carvings, bronze objects, lacquer ware, jade ornaments, and seals, as well as sections of the Yang Sheng Fang manuscript, a medical text that outlines various techniques of enhancing vitality and lengthening life. These artworks, portraying aspects of daily life ranging from food to cosmetics and fashion, from entertainment to healthcare and exercise, provide a fascinating picture of reverence to the afterlife imparted by the ancients more than 2,000 years ago.

Organized by Willow Hai Chang, Director of China Institute Gallery, and curated by Chen Jianming, Director of the Hunan Provincial Museum, Noble Tombs at Mawangdui represents the most extensive collection of Mawangdui items ever on view in the United States. A fully-illustrated bilingual catalogue will accompany the exhibition.

Cost: 
$7

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