You are here

Asia, America, and the Transformation of Geopolitics

USC U.S.-China Institute Board of Scholars member William Overholt will speak on US-China relations.

When:
November 28, 2007 4:00pm to 5:30pm
Print

In this talk Dr. William Overholt draws on his newest book. He argues American security and prosperity now depend on Asia. Drawing on decades of political and business experience, he contends that obsolete Cold War attitudes tie the U.S. increasingly to an otherwise isolated Japan and obscure the reality that a U.S.-Chinese bicondominium now manages most Asian issues. Ascendant military priorities risk gratuitously polarizing the region, weaken the economic relationships that engendered American preeminence, and ironically enhance Chinese influence. As a result, despite its Cold War victory, U.S. influence in Asia is declining. Overholt doubts that democracy promotion will lead to superior development and peace, and forecasts a new era where Asian geopolitics could take a drastically different shape.

William H. Overholt is a member of the USC U.S.-China Institute Board of Scholars. He holds the Asia Policy Research Chair at RAND's Center for Asia Pacific Policy and is Director of the Center. He has long been an important analyst of Asia. Dr. Overholt is the author of the The Rise of China (W.W. Norton, 1993), which won the Mainichi News/Asian Affairs Research Center Special Book Prize. He has also written or co-written, Political Risk (Euromoney, 1982), Strategic Planning and Forecasting, with William Ascher (John Wiley, 1983), and Asia's Nuclear Future (Westview Press, 1976). In 1976 he founded the semi-annual Global Assessment, with Zbigniew Brzezinski, and edited it until 1988.

Dr. Overholt spoke in April 2007 at USCI's inaugural conference. A video of his talk is available at the conference website.

Please RSVP to uschina@usc.edu.

Parking on the USC campus is $8. Please enter campus through Gate 3 on Figueroa St. and 35th St. and purchase parking for Parking Structure X. Click here to download a campus map.

Cost: 
Free - please RSVP to uschina@usc.edu

Events

November 28, 2018 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute for a screening of Nowhere to Call Home, which offers a rare glimpse into the world of a Tibetan farmer, torn between her traditional way of life and her desire for her son to have a better future in the city. Followed by a post-screening discussion with director Jocelyn Ford.

January 24, 2019 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute for a book talk with journalist and author Leta Hong Fincher. Betraying Big Brother is a story of how the feminist movement in China against patriarchy could reconfigure the country and the rest of the world.