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Environment

Environmental Film Festival: "Born in China"

The Freer Sackler will host a screening of Disneynature's film "Born in China."

Absurd Recreation

A multi-media group exhibition of nine artists from China who engage in an absurdist "recreation" of settings, events, and situations in reaction to the rapidly changing social and cultural landscape in China.

Muscolino, The Ecology of War in China - Henan Province, the Yellow River and Beyond, 1938-1950, 2014

Micah Muscolino's book was reviewed by Sravani Biswas and published on the History of War discussion list. It is reprinted here via Creative Commons license.
 

The Many Forms of Environmental Activism in China: Linking Local and Global?

Featured Speaker: Mujun Zhou, Center for Chinese Studies postdoctoral fellow 2015-2016

Conversation with Barbara Finamore, author of Will China Save the Planet?

Join the WSCRC for a book talk with Barbara Finamore, Senior Strategic Director for Asia  at the Natural Resources Defense Council and author of Will China Save the Planet? 

Ecological Civilization and Eco-social Transformation in China

The University of California, San Diego presents Professor Chen Kegong, speaking on the topic of "Ecological Civilization and Eco-social Transformation in China."

Of Travels, Fruits, and Gardens: Jesuits and the European Knowledge of Chinese Plants and Gardens

A discussion of the role Jesuits played in disseminating information about Chinese horticulture and garden design.

The Origins of Sedentism and Agriculture in Early China

Stanford University presents a public talk on food production in China.

CEO Forum with Gary Hirshberg of Stonyfield Farm

Gary Hirshberg will discuss the possibility in a change in the way China produces its food and the effect an organic China could have on world markets.

Managing Scarcity: Water and Culture in Modern China

UC Berkeley Institute of East Asian Studies and Center for Chinese Studies co-host a talk by David Pietz

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Events

March 11, 2021 - 1:00pm

Julia Lovell re-evaluates Maoism as both a Chinese and an international force, linking its evolution in China with its global legacy.