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USC and China in the News: November and December 2017

China-related news stories featuring University of Southern California faculty, students, staff, and programs.

December 31, 2017
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Click here for earlier media pieces on USC and China.

Dec. 29, 2017: Deadline

USC political scientist Stanley Rosen was quoted in an artilce about China and Hollywood. He said, “China is pushing for investments related to the One Belt, One Road project– the new Silk Road — and the relationship with Hollywood is now taking the form of using Hollywood expertise and collaboration in making blockbuster action Chinese films for the China market, with Chinese heroes, most clearly seen in the collaboration with the Russo brothers in the very nationalistic film Wolf Warrior 2.”

Dec. 26, 2017: Financial Times

Stanley Rosen, USC political scientist, was quoted in an article about reduced Chinese interest in investing in Hollywood. Rosen said, "For the Chinese market, you self-censor because of its size... But there has been a backlash in Congress and elsewhere.

Dec. 25, 2017: Los Angeles Times

USC political scientist and Chinese film specialist Stanley Rosen was quoted in a story about the online video industry in China. He said, “The censors are always one step behind. Online films are a fast-moving target.”

Dec. 20, 2017: The Nanjinger

An article about the use of a hologram of a Nanjing massacre survivor to enable museum visitors to interact with the survivor noted that the exhibit was created by the USC Institute for Creative Technologies working with the USC Shoah Foundation.

Dec. 19, 2017: Voice of America

Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute was interviewed about the Trump administration's National Security Strategy. Dube discussed the limits to China’s willingness to help address threats posed by North Korea. He also noted that for the first time in such a report, the US identified China as a competitor in regions beyond Asia.

Dec. 19, 2017: SFGate

USC political scientist and Chinese film scholar Stanley Rosen was interviewed about the success of Coco, a Mexico-centered animated film, in China. “It’s on a case-by-case basis, but ‘Coco’ had a very colorful underworld that was a lot like an amusement park, and of course there’s a focus on cultural traditions that are quite similar to what is done in China,” said Rosen.

Dec. 14, 2017: Pasadena Weekly

The reopening of the USC Pacific Asia Museum was covered, focusing on the "Winds from Fusong" exhibit highlighting links between Mexico and China. The exhibit was curated by museum director Christina Yu Yu and Shengtian Zheng.

Dec. 8, 2017: Pasadena Star News

An article noted five must see items in the newly reopened USC Pacific Asia Museum. They included the exhibition on artistic links between Mexico and China. They included a drawing of a Beijing Opera performer by Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias completed in 1931 when he lived in China.

Dec. 5, 2017: Los Angeles Times

The USC Pacific Asia Museum's "Winds from Fusong: Mexico and China in the 20th Century" exhibit was featured. Co-curator Shengtian Zheng noted that the exhibit shows Western influences on Chinese art prior to China's late-20th century opening to the West. He said, “Very few acknowledge other influences occurring prior to the Cultural Revolution, especially during the mid-20th century when China was isolated from the outside world."

Nov. 20, 2017: Newsweek

An op-ed quoted something USC international relations specialist David Kang wrote in 2013, “In the distant past, China may have been the source of a long-lasting civilization in East Asia, but today it has no more civilizational influence in Asia than does modern Greece in Europe. Few contemporary East Asian states or peoples look to China for cultural innovation, national values, or practical solutions to present problems.”

Nov. 17, 2017: Providence Journal

Joshua Goldstein, USC historian, was quoted about new Chinese policies on imported materials for recycling. ″[China’s new policy] is pushing a lot of recyclers to think about better sorting,” he said. If the quality is high, then [a US company] probably does have an advantage.”

Nov. 13, 2017: McClatchy via The News Tribune

USC historican and specialist on recycling Joshua Goldstein was quoted in a story about changes in China's policies on recycling. “The entire waste management sector is going through a sea change,” he said. He also noted that a documentary made by Wang Jiuliang, Plastic China influenced policymakers. Goldstein said, “There is some sense that folks high up in the government have seen this and are disturbed by it.” The article was widely published, including in the Leader-Telegram.

more here: http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/business/article184416433.html#storylink=cpy

Nov. 10, 2017: Globe and Mail

Speaking in Hong Kong, USC U.S.-China Institute senior fellow Mike Chinoy told reporters, ""Trump has mortgaged the whole U.S.-China relationship to get the Chinese on board with the North Korea plan."

Nov. 9, 2017: New York Times

U.S. President Donald Trump's popularity in China may be partially due to the fact that he is unpredicatable and "beholden to no one," USC political scientist Stanley Rosen is quoted as saying.

Nov. 9, 2017: World Journal 世界日报

Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute was interviewed regarding the Trump-Xi summit in Beijing. Among the points Dube made is that the U.S. should not expect China to "handle" the North Korean challenge. Instead, the U.S. needs to work with allies and others to deter North Korea from using its weapons and to contain the threat it poses. United Daily News 联合新闻 also carried the story.

Nov. 9, 2017: Apple Daily 蘋果日報

The documentary Vanished Archives by Hong Kong journalist Connie Yan-wai Lo was screened at USC. A USC student and Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute were interviewed about the film. Dube noted that the 1967 Hong Kong riots were an important event and that Lo's film performed an important service by recovering information no longer available in Hong Kong's archives.

Nov. 9, 2017: Vanity Fair

Mike Chinoy, USC U.S.-China Institute senior fellow, was quoted, “The Chinese have figured out how to play Trump: flatter him. And there’s nothing the Chinese do better than wow foreign diplomats.”

Nov. 8, 2017: World Journal 世界日报

Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute and USC political scientist Stanley Rosen were interviewed about the Ma Ying-jeou visit to USC. Dube noted that a group of USC scholars met with Ma in March 2016 and at that time the Taiwanese president said he feared the incoming Tsai administration did not grasp the energy and effort required to maintain a healthy relationship with China. At his talk at USC, he reaffirmed the view that the Tsai administration needed to embrace the so-called "1992 Consensus" if it hoped to improve relations with Beijing. Rosen made a similar point, emphasizing the flexibility required in managing cross-strait relations.

Nov. 8, 2017

Several press items focused on the arrest of three UCLA basketball players for shoplifting in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province. USC political scientist Stanley Rosen was interviewed on the CBS Evening News and by KCBS/KCAL. Rosen and the USC U.S.-China Institute's Clayton Dube were interviewed by the Los Angeles Daily News. Dube was also interviewed by KCBS/KCAL and by Fox11.

Nov. 7, 2017: Associated Press via Fox News

Mike Chinoy, USC U.S.-China Institute senior fellow, was quoted in an article about Pres. Trump's trip to Asia. He said, "Trump keeps portraying his relationship with XI as great pals but that's wildly naive. The Chinese have figured out how to play Trump: flatter him. And there's nothing the Chinese do better than wow foreign diplomats." CBS also published the AP account.

Nov. 7, 2017: Global Times

Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute discussed how China has changed since the 1980s and the increasing role China plays in the lives of Americans. He also discussed what makes the institute special and why Los Angeles is a good place to examine U.S.-China relations.

Nov. 6, 2017: US China Press 僑報

The presentation by former Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou at USC was described. The public talk was organized by the Center on Public Diplomacy. The report noted that Ma discussed Taiwan's ties with mainland China, Japan, and the United States. A Yahoo News article (11/3) noted that Ma would speak at USC during three days in Los Angeles. 

Nov. 6, 2017: Reuters via Business Insider

Stanley Rosen, USC political scientist, was quoted about Pres. Trump's Asia policy and trip to Asia. He said, "The US and India have a common interest in not having an assertive China dominating the region."

Nov. 6, 2017: Associated Press via Macau Daily Times

USC U.S.-China Institute senior fellow Mike Chinoy was quoted in a story about Pres. Trump's trip to Asia and the possibility of a North Korean response. Chinoy said, “There’s a danger if there is a lot of muscle flexing. Trump has been going right up to the edge and I wouldn’t rule out some sort of forceful North Korean reaction to Trump’s presence in the region."

Nov. 6, 2017: Central News Agency via Taipei Times

Former Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou began a visit to Southern California at the invitation of the University of Southern California and the Pacific Council for International Policy. Ma will speak at USC on Nov. 6 and meet privately with students.

Nov. 4, 2017: Associated Press via Toronto Star

As Donald Trump begins his first trip to Asia as president, Mike Chinoy, a USC U.S.-China Institute senior fellow, was quoted, “There’s a danger if there is a lot of muscle flexing. Trump has been going right up to the edge and I wouldn’t rule out some sort of forceful North Korean reaction to Trump’s presence in the region.”

Nov. 3, 2017: Xinhua

Clayton Dube, of the USC U.S.-China Institute, spoke at the opening of the inaugural China-US Film and Television Innovation Summit held at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Linwood Dunn Theater. He noted that while technological advances are important, their ultimate impact depends on how they help filmmakers tell compelling stories. Other speakers included USC cinema professor Michael Peyser, producers/directors such as Andre Morgan, Tom Jacobson, Stanley Tong, and Feng Xiaoning. Distributors such as Jiang Yanming and Gu Guoqing as well as the heads of the China Literary and Art Federation Xi Meijuan and other industry figures. 

 

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Events

April 19, 2018 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

The USC US-China Institute presents a talk by William Overholt on his new book, China's Crisis of Success.

April 26, 2018 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California
Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute and USC professor Brett Sheehan for a discussion on the evolution of Chinese capitalism chronicling the fortunes of the Song family of North China under five successive authoritarian governments.