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Tom, "Victimization in Hong Kong children's peer groups," 2005

USC thesis in Children.
August 24, 2009
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Shelley Tom, M.A.

Abstract (Summary)
This study reports a cross-sectional investigation of the behavioral and academic correlates of victimization in Chinese children's peer groups in Hong Kong. The participants were 1,361 children (670 boys and 691 girls, from 7 to 16 years-old) recruited from 5 urban and semi-urban schools in Hong Kong, PR China. Multi-informant assessments (peer nominations and teacher ratings) of peer victimization, submissive-withdrawl, low levels of prosocial-assertiveness, aggression, and poor academic functioning were obtained. Peer victimization scores were positively correlated with submissive-withdrawn behavior, low levels of prosocial-assertive behavior, and poor academic functioning. Regression analyses indicated that the association between submissive-withdrawn behavior and victimization by peers was consistent across different age groups of Chinese children. Taken together, these findings replicate past research on the correlates of peer victimization in both Western and Asian settings.

Advisor: Schwartz, David

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