You are here

Andrew Nathan, Columbia University

Andrew Nathan spoke at the USC U.S.-China Institute conference on “The Future of U.S.-China Relations.” His presentation was entitled "Political Culture and Democratic Legitimacy in Asia."
March 27, 2007
Print
 

This video is also available on the USCI YouTube Channel.

Please click on the play button to view the presentation. The conference website has links to video from the conference and to many of the papers presented there.

Andrew J. Nathan is Class of 1919 Professor and Chair of the Department of Political Science at ColumbiaUniversity. His teaching and research interests include Chinese politics and foreign policy, the comparative study of political participation and political culture, and human rights. He has authored or edited numerous books, including Constructing Human Rights in the Age of Globalization, co-edited with Mahmood Monshipouri, Neil Englehart, and Kavita Philip (M.E. Sharpe, 2003), China’s New Rulers: The Secret Files, with Bruce Gilley (N.Y Review Books, 2002, 2nd ed. 2003), Negotiating Culture and Human Rights: Beyond Universalism and Relativism, co-edited with Lynda S. Bell and Ilan Peleg (Columbia University Press, 2001), The Tiananmen Papers, edited with Perry Link (Public Affairs, 2001); China's Transition (Columbia University Press, 1997); The Great Wall and the Empty Fortress: China's Search for Security, with Robert S. Ross (W. W. Norton, 1997), and China's Crisis (Columbia University Press, 1990).

 

Print

Events

August 19, 2019 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute and Asia Society for a talk with Weijian Shan, one of Asia’s best-known financiers, as he recounts his remarkable personal story of his exile to the Gobi Desert for hard labor at the age of 15 amidst the turmoil of Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution.

September 5, 2019 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

The USC U.S.-China Institute presents a book talk with journalist and author Matt Sheehan. His new book chronicles the deep and interdependent socioeconomic exchanges between China and California.