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Video: #MillennialMinds

Watch presentations from the #MillennialMinds symposium the USC U.S.-China Institute hosted in Shanghai in April 2015. The speakers explored the aspirations of young Chinese and Americans with regard to school, work, romance, and life.
April 10, 2015
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In China there are 316 million people between the ages of 15 and 30. In the U.S., there are 66 million. In what ways are they similar? How do they differ?

What’s on the minds of millennials (八零后和九零后一代) in China and America? What are their hopes and worries?  At this symposium, we’ll be exploring the aspirations of young Chinese and Americans with regard to school, work, romance, and life. What are their attitudes toward gender and generational roles? What obligations do they feel towards their own dreams, toward their families, their friends, their employers, and their communities? What does how they spend their time and money signal about their priorities?

Watch the video presentations of leading researchers, businesspeople and journalists about these and other questions.

Panel 1: Understanding and Reaching Millennial Consumers

Clayton Dube 杜克雷, Outline of the Future
Harry Hui 许智伟, Connecting with Millennials
Chen Yougang 陈有钢, Millennial Consumers

Panel 2: Love and Marriage Among Millennials
Julie AlbrightOnline Love
Chen Binbin 陈斌斌, Dating and Marriage among Shanghai's '80s Generation

Panel 3: Teaching, Entertaining, and Working with Chinese Millennials
Ching-ching Ni 倪青青, Training and Working with Millennials
Stanley Rosen 骆思典, Western Culture and Chinese Youth

Pannel 4: Rethinking Parenthood?
Shen Yifei 沈奕斐, 'Hot Mom:' Motherhood, Feminism, and Asserting One's Individuality in China
Shen Ke 沈可, Young Shanghai Couples and Childbearing

Luncheon Keynote
Glenn OsakiBusiness Citizenship: Connecting Business Needs and Millennials Expectations

 

#MillennialMinds was organized by the USC U.S.-China Institute 南加州大学美中学院 and co-sponsored by the USC Alumni Club of Shanghai 上海的南加州大学校友会.

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Events

January 17, 2019 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

One of the most influential modern Chinese writers and the author of Lust, Caution, Eileen Chang passed away in Los Angeles in 1995. After her death, Dominic Cheung, Professor Emeritus at USC, took care of her sea burial in San Pedro and set up the Eileen Chang Special Collection in the East Asian Library at USC in 1997. Cheung will discuss these experiences as a part of the lecture series titled Los Angeles and Shanghai: The USC Nexus.

January 24, 2019 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute for a book talk with journalist and author Leta Hong Fincher. Betraying Big Brother is a story of how the feminist movement in China against patriarchy could reconfigure the country and the rest of the world.