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Events

  • 30 Years after Showa: Japan - China Relations in Uncharted Eras

    February 28, 2019 - 4:00pm
    Los Angeles, California

    The USC U.S.-China Institute presents a discussion with Akira Chiba, the Consul General of the Japanese consulate in Los Angeles, on Japan's relations with China.

    Event Details
  • Carl Minzner: End of an Era

    March 6, 2019 - 4:00pm
    Los Angeles, California

    Carl Minzner joins the USC U.S.-China Institute for a conversation about his new book. End of an Era argues that China's reform era is ending, and outlines the potential outcomes that could result.    

    Event Details
  • American Wheels on Chinese Roads

    March 27, 2019 - 4:30pm
    Los Angeles, California
    Michael Dunne, author of American Wheels: Chinese Roads, will focus on General Motors in China since 1989. The discussion will be followed by a short introduction to the Mark L. Moody collection at the USC East Asian Library. 
     
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  • Barbara Finamore: Will China Save the Planet?

    April 11, 2019 - 4:00pm
    Los Angeles, California

    Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute for a book talk with author and leading China environmental expert Barbara Finamore as she examines China's role in the future of the global climate. 

     

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  • Screening: Tiananmen Square

    April 9, 2019 - 4:00pm
    Los Angeles, California

    Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute for a screening of an episode of the Assignment: China series on American media coverage of China. This episode focuses on the work of journalists covering the massive demonstrations that rocked Beijing in spring 1989. Followed by a Q&A with Mike Chinoy, who wrote and narrates the episode.

    Event Details
March 6, 2019 - 12:00pm
Berkeley, California

 Gina Marchetti, Director of the Center for the Study of Globalization and Cultures, University of Hong Kong

 Department of Gender and Women's StudiesMedia Studies

'Feminist Studies and Visual Media' Spring 2019 Gender and Women’s Studies Lecture series
Cosponsored by Media Studies and Center for Race and Gender
Organized and Moderated by Professor Minoo Moallem

March 6, 2019 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

Carl Minzner joins the USC U.S.-China Institute for a conversation about his new book. End of an Era argues that China's reform era is ending, and outlines the potential outcomes that could result.    

March 7, 2019 - 6:30pm
Los Angeles, California

The California Historical Society and Chinese American Museum host a panel on the past/present/future of Los Angeles and San Francisco's Chinatowns.

March 8, 2019 - 9:00am
Berkeley, California

The classic Zhuangzi 莊子, a collection of sayings and anecdotes traditionally attributed to Zhuang Zhou 莊周 (trad. 369-286 BCE), has deeply influenced cultural life in East Asia and beyond. A key text in East Asian religious and literary history, it is still routinely cited in diverse discussions of ethics and philosophy, and informs practices from calligraphy to landscape painting.

March 8, 2019 - 4:00pm
Colombus, Ohio

The Institute for Chinese Studies presents "The Centenary of the May Fourth Movement" Lecture Series:

Hsin-I Sydney Yueh
Associate Professor, Dept. of Communication Studies
Northeastern State University

"Understanding Taiwanese Culture through the Native Term Sajiao" (tentative title)

March 9, 2019 - 9:00am
Berkeley, California

The classic Zhuangzi 莊子, a collection of sayings and anecdotes traditionally attributed to Zhuang Zhou 莊周 (trad. 369-286 BCE), has deeply influenced cultural life in East Asia and beyond. A key text in East Asian religious and literary history, it is still routinely cited in diverse discussions of ethics and philosophy, and informs practices from calligraphy to landscape painting.

March 14, 2019 - 4:00pm
La Jolla, California

UC San Diego's 21st Century China Center hosts a talk by Davin Chor on how the recent downturn in China is affecting political stability.

March 15, 2019 - 9:30am
Berkeley, California

East Asia since 2010 has been characterized by the rise of China and the relative decline of the U.S., and by a corresponding disorder as China has increasingly openly defied the game rules set by the erstwhile hegemon and begun tentatively to outline an alternative set of rules. The systemic consequence is a state of what Durkheim called anomie, a liminal period between one set of norms and another. In the context of anomie there has been heightened ideological or normative competition on the one hand and an increasing resort to power politics on the other. This state of affairs, and the corresponding shift in public opinions, has materialized with bewildering swiftness, clearly exacerbated by the Trump administration. But whatever the future of the “trade war” and the embattled Trump presidency, this is not purely a Trump phenomenon; it can be expected to last for as long as the underlying shift in the power balance that set it in motion remains unresolved. 

March 19, 2019 - 12:00pm
Los Angeles, California

Chinese foreign direct investment in the United States has generated intense debates. Some welcome it for the immediate benefits such as job creation; others view Chinese investments, especially those controlled by the Chinese government, as a critical threat. The debates have so far missed an important question: how do Chinese companies investing in the US react to the host country's law? Ji Li formulates a novel analytical framework to examine the adaptation of Chinese companies to general US institutions and their compliance with US laws governing tax, employment equality, and national security review of foreign investments. The level of compliance varies, and this variation is examined in relation to company ownership, including state ownership. Li's analysis is based on interviews and a unique and comprehensive dataset about Chinese companies in the United States that has never been systematically explored.

March 20, 2019 - 4:00pm
Berkeley, California

 Jianhua Dai, Professor in the Institute of Comparative Literature and Culture, Peking University

 Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

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