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Emblems of a Prosperous Life: Women’s Robes of Late Imperial China (1700s – 1800s)

Many of these garments exemplify a fashion trend of the 1800s: cuffs and hems embellished with embroidered bands, which in turn were often edged with strips of brocaded ribbon. (July 14, 2018 - June 30, 2019)

When:
June 30, 2019 10:00am
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In the 1700s and 1800s, aristocratic Chinese women wore sumptuous clothing in and out of court. At court, women’s attire was highly standardized; outside court, they had greater flexibility to choose styles and designs that matched their personal taste. Robes arranged with medallion designs were considered the most formal. Robes with overall scattered schemes were less formal, and robes with only decorative borders and plain grounds were the least formal. Floral imagery, already popular for hundreds of years, became increasingly realistic at this time. 

Events

March 27, 2019 - 4:30pm
Los Angeles, California

Michael Dunne, author of American Wheels: Chinese Roads, will focus on General Motors in China since 1989. The discussion will be followed by a short introduction to the Mark L. Moody collection at the USC East Asian Library. 

April 9, 2019 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute for a screening of an episode of the Assignment: China series on American media coverage of China. This episode focuses on the work of journalists covering the massive demonstrations that rocked Beijing in spring 1989. Followed by a Q&A with USCI's Mike Chinoy, who covered the demonstrations for CNN.