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Children to Immortals: Figural Representations in Chinese Art

Some of the objects in this exhibition are recognized masterpieces, while others are little known and have not been on view for decades. Mainly drawn from The Met collection, this exhibition showcases diverse media, including textiles, lacquer, jade, ceramic, wood, bamboo, and metalwork.

Now till 2/23/2019

When:
February 23, 2019 10:00am
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Conveying a person's inner spirit (chuanshen) is the central aspect of figural representation in Chinese art. Rather than prioritizing accurate anatomical renderings, artists sought to capture the "life energy" of their subjects. This exhibition explores sophisticated decorative arts that depict figures dating to late imperial China, from the Song (960–1279) to the Qing (1644–1911) dynasty. Over this thousand-year period, images of humans, legendary figures, and immortals frequently appeared. The first gallery focuses on children, a ubiquitous and long-standing motif expressing the cultural importance of offspring. The second gallery displays scenes from idealized daily life, historical novels, and legends. Various religious figures from Buddhism and Daoism are presented in the third gallery.

Events

March 27, 2019 - 4:30pm
Los Angeles, California

Michael Dunne, author of American Wheels: Chinese Roads, will focus on General Motors in China since 1989. The discussion will be followed by a short introduction to the Mark L. Moody collection at the USC East Asian Library. 

April 9, 2019 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute for a screening of an episode of the Assignment: China series on American media coverage of China. This episode focuses on the work of journalists covering the massive demonstrations that rocked Beijing in spring 1989. Followed by a Q&A with USCI's Mike Chinoy, who covered the demonstrations for CNN.