You are here

Yu, ""All in fun": A translation with an introduction," 1995

USC thesis in Literature.
August 26, 2009
Print

Xiao Yu, M.A.

Abstract (Summary)
The Beijing novelist Wang Shuo is one of the most popular writers to emerge in the late 1980s. The exceptional popularity of his writings, films and TV series is referred to as the "Wang Shuo Phenomenon."

This thesis, aiming to introduce to the western reader Wang Shuo and the Chinese society he reflects in his works, consists of an annotated translation of a most representative but much-ignored work of his, "All in Fun" (yidian zhengjing meiyou), and a detailed introduction of the author, the "Wang Shuo Phenomenon," the language of his fiction, as well as the translated novella, which is in many ways a more significant work than the extremely well-known "The Troubleshooters" (wanzhu), especially in its thorough mockery of intellectuals, writers, and the literary and art circles in general, one of the most important themes of Wang Shuo's works.

Advisor: Hayden, George

Print

Events

March 23, 2017 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

Please join the USC U.S.-China Institute for a book talk by Guobin Yang. The first part of the book offers a new explanation of factional violence in the Red Guard movement and the second part of the book chronicles the de-sacralization of that revolutionary culture throughout the 1970s and the rise of a new wave of protest that inaugurated the democratic movements of the reform era.

April 6, 2017 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

The USC U.S.-China Institute presents a talk by USC Professor Emerita Charlotte Furth on her adventures in Beijing teaching young Chinese scholars about America.