You are here

Wu, "Worlds incomplete: From nation to person," 1997

USC thesis in Culture.
August 26, 2009
Print

Ju-hua Wu, M.A.

Abstract (Summary)
Contemporary anthropological theory suggests that individual identities are constructed through various personal and national experiences. In this thesis, the author uses travel theory to elucidate the parallels between the recent history of Taiwan, her father's emigration from mainland China to Taiwan during the Communist revolution in 1949, and her own immigration from Taiwan to the United States. The thesis also demonstrates how history and her father's and her own memories of these experiences have been intertwined with the Kuomingtang's "China-centered" ideology on Taiwan to shape their personal identities. The author incorporates her own personal narrative in the discussion of how discourses of the nation-state constitute personal identities. Through the examination of this process, the author concludes that identities should be constructed "against culture," against a timeless, homogenous, and static collective category.

Advisor: Not listed

Print

Events

December 5, 2017 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

The USC U.S.-China Institute presents a book talk by Scott Tong and a unique perspective on the transitions in China through the eyes of regular people.

April 6, 2018 - 8:00am
Los Angeles, California

"Finding Solutions" will focus on the work of individuals, companies, and NGOs to address some of China’s pressing challenges. We hope you will be able to join this important discussion on April 6.