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Wang, "The influence of sex composition of existing children on birth intentions in rural China," 1996

USC thesis in Demographics.
August 26, 2009
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Yuhai Wang, M.S.

Abstract (Summary)
Son preference is strongly believed to stand in the way of further fertility decline in rural China. However, previous studies failed to show clear effects of sex preference on parents' intentions to have additional children. Based on a national household economy and fertility survey, this thesis examines the relationship between sex composition and birth intentions in rural China. It is found that son preference exists in all types of families. It is also found that mother's age, parents' education, and father's occupation have negative effects on birth intentions. I conclude that sex preference is still influencing birth intentions in rural China. The extent of effects varies among families with different number of surviving children, varies among parents of different age, education, and occupation.

Advisor: Heer, David M.

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