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USC and China in the News: November and December 2017

China-related news stories featuring University of Southern California faculty, students, staff, and programs.

November 13, 2017
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Click here for earlier media pieces on USC and China.

Nov. 10, 2017: Globe and Mail

Speaking in Hong Kong, USC U.S.-China Institute senior fellow Mike Chinoy told reporters, ""Trump has mortgaged the whole U.S.-China relationship to get the Chinese on board with the North Korea plan."

Nov. 9, 2017: World Journal 世界日报

Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute was interviewed regarding the Trump-Xi summit in Beijing. Among the points Dube made is that the U.S. should not expect China to "handle" the North Korean challenge. Instead, the U.S. needs to work with allies and others to deter North Korea from using its weapons and to contain the threat it poses. United Daily News 联合新闻 also carried the story.

Nov. 9, 2017: Apple Daily 蘋果日報

The documentary Vanished Archives by Hong Kong journalist Connie Yan-wai Lo was screened at USC. A USC student and Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute were interviewed about the film. Dube noted that the 1967 Hong Kong riots were an important event and that Lo's film performed an important service by recovering information no longer available in Hong Kong's archives.

Nov. 9, 2017: Vanity Fair

Mike Chinoy, USC U.S.-China Institute senior fellow, was quoted, “The Chinese have figured out how to play Trump: flatter him. And there’s nothing the Chinese do better than wow foreign diplomats.”

Nov. 8, 2017: World Journal 世界日报

Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute and USC political scientist Stanley Rosen were interviewed about the Ma Ying-jeou visit to USC. Dube noted that a group of USC scholars met with Ma in March 2016 and at that time the Taiwanese president said he feared the incoming Tsai administration did not grasp the energy and effort required to maintain a healthy relationship with China. At his talk at USC, he reaffirmed the view that the Tsai administration needed to embrace the so-called "1992 Consensus" if it hoped to improve relations with Beijing. Rosen made a similar point, emphasizing the flexibility required in managing cross-strait relations.

Nov. 8, 2017

Several press items focused on the arrest of three UCLA basketball players for shoplifting in Hangzhou, Zhejiang province. USC political scientist Stanley Rosen was interviewed on the CBS Evening News and by KCBS/KCAL. Rosen and the USC U.S.-China Institute's Clayton Dube were interviewed by the Los Angeles Daily News. Dube was also interviewed by KCBS/KCAL and by Fox11.

Nov. 7, 2017: Associated Press via Fox News

Mike Chinoy, USC U.S.-China Institute senior fellow, was quoted in an article about Pres. Trump's trip to Asia. He said, "Trump keeps portraying his relationship with XI as great pals but that's wildly naive. The Chinese have figured out how to play Trump: flatter him. And there's nothing the Chinese do better than wow foreign diplomats."

Nov. 7, 2017: Global Times

Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute discussed how China has changed since the 1980s and the increasing role China plays in the lives of Americans. He also discussed what makes the institute special and why Los Angeles is a good place to examine U.S.-China relations.

Nov. 6, 2017: US China Press 僑報

The presentation by former Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou at USC was described. The public talk was organized by the Center on Public Diplomacy. The report noted that Ma discussed Taiwan's ties with mainland China, Japan, and the United States. A Yahoo News article (11/3) noted that Ma would speak at USC during three days in Los Angeles. 

Nov. 6, 2017: Reuters via Business Insider

Stanley Rosen, USC political scientist, was quoted about Pres. Trump's Asia policy and trip to Asia. He said, "The US and India have a common interest in not having an assertive China dominating the region."

Nov. 6, 2017: Associated Press via Macau Daily Times

USC U.S.-China Institute senior fellow Mike Chinoy was quoted in a story about Pres. Trump's trip to Asia and the possibility of a North Korean response. Chinoy said, “There’s a danger if there is a lot of muscle flexing. Trump has been going right up to the edge and I wouldn’t rule out some sort of forceful North Korean reaction to Trump’s presence in the region."

Nov. 6, 2017: Central News Agency via Taipei Times

Former Taiwan President Ma Ying-jeou began a visit to Southern California at the invitation of the University of Southern California and the Pacific Council for International Policy. Ma will speak at USC on Nov. 6 and meet privately with students.

Nov. 4, 2017: Associated Press via Toronto Star

As Donald Trump begins his first trip to Asia as president, Mike Chinoy, a USC U.S.-China Institute senior fellow, was quoted, “There’s a danger if there is a lot of muscle flexing. Trump has been going right up to the edge and I wouldn’t rule out some sort of forceful North Korean reaction to Trump’s presence in the region.”

Nov. 3, 2017: Xinhua

Clayton Dube, of the USC U.S.-China Institute, spoke at the opening of the inaugural China-US Film and Television Innovation Summit held at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Linwood Dunn Theater. He noted that while technological advances are important, their ultimate impact depends on how they help filmmakers tell compelling stories. Other speakers included USC cinema professor Michael Peyser, producers/directors such as Andre Morgan, Tom Jacobson, Stanley Tong, and Feng Xiaoning. Distributors such as Jiang Yanming and Gu Guoqing as well as the heads of the China Literary and Art Federation Xi Meijuan and other industry figures. 

 

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Events

December 5, 2017 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

The USC U.S.-China Institute presents a book talk by Scott Tong and a unique perspective on the transitions in China through the eyes of regular people.

April 6, 2018 - 8:00am
Los Angeles, California

"Finding Solutions" will focus on the work of individuals, companies, and NGOs to address some of China’s pressing challenges. We hope you will be able to join this important discussion on April 6.