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USC and China in the News, March and April 2015

China-related news stories featuring University of Southern California faculty, students, staff, and programs.
April 14, 2015
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April 30, 2015: Marketplace
 
USC Marshall School of Business finance specialist Baizhu Chen was interviewed for a story about China's government now requiring banks to have deposit insurance. Chen said,  “the government does not want to have this extra financial burden on [the government] every time the banks have some problems.”
 
April 29, 2015: KCRW
 
The NPR affiliate interviewed Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute on contemporary tensions in East Asia stemming from Japan's actions and depictions of those actions in World War II.
April 14, 2015: South China Morning Post
 
USC political scientist Stanley Rosen was quoted about the prospects for Chinese films to find large audiences in the United States. He noted that it was unlikely that any film would do as well as Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon did fifteen years ago. He said that China’s censorship system was an important limiting factor, "They don't want to show anything bad or negative about China; they want positive images. They don't want anything that's too edgy, and political decisions overcome any artistic decisions."
 
April 14, 2015: US-China Press 桥报
 
USC professors Larry Namer and Michael Peyser were among those attending the North American Film Schools exhibition, a student-organized event, which included Chinese filmmakers and actors. 
 
April 3, 2015: Fortune
 
Chinese Student and Scholar Associations at USC and other area schools receive financial support from The Beverly Center and other malls which see them as future Angelenos and are anxious to cultivate them as customers. 
 
March 17, 2015: KCRW
The "To The Point" program interviewed Clayton Dube of the USC U.S.-China Institute about the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade proposal. Dube said that the Obama administration was using China's rise as a mobilization tool to rally U.S. support for this agreement. He noted that U.S.-China trade is already huge and would likely be unaffected by TPP not including China.
 
 
USC Annenberg journalism professor Marc Cooper visited China to work with journalists in Beijing, Chengdu, and Shanghai. Other articles included pictures of Cooper’s visit: http://news.xinhuanet.com/zgjx/2015-03/23/c_134090135.htm , http://news.xinhuanet.com/zgjx/2015-03/23/c_134089781.htm. Cooper visited Fudan University, Sichuan Daily, and other units. 
 
March 10, 2015: OC Register
 
An article about Facebook addiction mentioned research by Ofir Turel and four USC and Chinese researchers. Turel is a scholar in residence at USC’s Brain and Creativity Institute.
 
March 2015: Singtao Daily 星岛日报
 
Caroline Lim, a PhD student at the USC School of Social Work, was interviewed about how mental illness is regarded in Chinese culture.
 
March 5, 2015: Phoenix TV
 
USC political scientist Stanley Rosen was interviewed about the drop in the proportion of Americans who consider China is a threat. A Gallup poll found that the proportion had dropped from 52% to 40%. Rosen said, “China is taking a back seat right now. There are so many other dangers in the world that people aren’t even thinking about China.” 
 

Media inquiries? Please call us at 213-821-4382 or write to us at uschina@usc.edu.

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Events

August 30, 2017 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

The USC U.S.-China Institute presents a talk by Douglas Fuller from Zhejiang University. Fuller's new book, "Paper Tigers, Hidden Dragons," provides an in-depth longitudinal study of China's information technology industry and policy over the last 15 years. 

August 31, 2017 - 4:00pm
Los Angeles, California

USC US-China Institute director Clay Dube will ask Julie Makinen of the L.A. Times, Jonathan Karp of the Asia Society, and May Lee of CCTV what it takes to report on complex and ever-changing China.