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Lee, "Goal orientation, goal setting, and academic performance in college students: An integrated model of achievement motivation in school settings," 1997

USC Dissertation in Education.
August 26, 2009
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Linda Hsiaoling Lee, Ph.D.

Abstract (Summary)
A correlational study examining the relationships among motivational beliefs, goal setting, effort, persistence, and academic performance was conducted using two hundred and sixty-two (262) students drawn from six intact classes in two selected colleges in Taiwan. Two self-report questionnaires measuring students' task value, goal orientation, self-efficacy, control belief, goal level, and expended time and effort were administered in one semester; and course grades were collected. A structural model was hypothesized and tested using the Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) technique. Results showed that extrinsic goal orientation had a direct, positive effect on goal level; and goal level in turn had a direct, positive effect on academic performance. In consequence, extrinsic goal orientation had an indirect, positive effect on academic performance through goal level. This study also found that self-efficacy had a direct, positive effect on goal commitment in terms of time and effort expended; and goal commitment in turn had a direct, positive effect on academic performance. Consequently, self-efficacy had an indirect, positive effect on academic performance through goal commitment. The positive relationship between goal level and goal commitment, as suggested by Locke and Latham's (1990) goal setting theory, was also found in this study; however, it did not reach the level of statistical significance. A cross-cultural comparison with the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) study on American college students (Pintrich, Smith, Garcia, & McKeachie, 1991) was also conducted.

Advisor: Not listed

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