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Kwei, "An elderly perspective: A case study of elderly residents' preferences and opinions on housing in various communities in Beijing," 2009

USC thesis in Gerontology and Urban Planning.
August 3, 2009
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Julia Kwei, M.S

Abstract (Summary)

The "aging crisis" is a concern that is magnified in China due to its large population. Housing is a concern for the Chinese government in the future because China will have one of the largest aging populations that will need services and amenities in and around their living arrangements. The government will soon be faced with this "crisis" and is trying to find solutions to address the problem. The goal of this study is to paint a picture of what the elderly want in Beijing in regards to housing and their environment as they age that might help inform policy makers how to address this problem in the future. Research was conducted through the use of focus groups, participant observation, and home visits.

Advisor: Pynoos, Jon
Committee members: Chi, IrisMyrtle, Robert

More articles and documents on aging:

As China Ages: Elderly Health Outcomes and Socioeconomic Status | Social support, social change, and psychological well-being of the elderly in China: Does the type and source of support matter? | An elderly perspective: A case study of elderly residents' preferences and opinions on housing in various communities in Beijing | The Health and Well-Being of the Elderly in China: Evidence from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS)China Trip Offers Wisdom on Aging | Intergenerational social support and the psychological well-being of older parents in China | Delegates Discuss Aging in China | Grant to Yield More Study on Elderly | A Profile of the Chinese Aged Population: Results from 2000 and 2006 National Surveys Aging in China Covered During USC Visit

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