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Wendi Adamek: “Tathāgatagarbha-Related Materials in North China, 6th-7th Centuries”

The Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford presents Wendi L. Adamek as she examines tathagatagarbha-related texts used in sites in 6th-7th century North China or written by figures active in that milieu.

When:
April 22, 2017 9:00am
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Abstract: 
In this seminar we examine tathagatagarbha-related texts used in sites in 6th-7th century North China or written by figures active in that milieu. Selections include passages from the Nirvana-sutra, the Dasheng qixin lun 大乘起信論 (Treatise on the Awakening of Faith in the Mahayana), Jingying Huiyuan’s 淨影慧遠 (523-592) Dasheng yizhang 大乘義章 (Chapters on the Meaning of the Mahayana), a mortuary inscription for Huiyuan’s collaborator Huixiu 慧休 (547-646), and others.
 
Bio: 
Wendi L. Adamek is Associate Professor in the Department of Classics and Religion at the University of Calgary and holder of the Numata Chair in Buddhist Studies. Her research interests include medieval Chinese Buddhism and Daoism, Buddhist art, comparative philosophy, and environmental literature. Her forthcoming book Practicescape: The Buddhists of Baoshan centers on a seventh-century community in Henan, China. Previous publications include The Mystique of Transmission (AAR Award for Excellence in Textual Studies, 2008) and The Teachings of Master Wuzhu (2011).
 
Event Sponsor: 
Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford, Department of Religious Studies
 
Contact Email: 
 
This event belongs to the following series:
Cost: 
By Invitation Only

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