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Harvard-Yenching Institute Annual Roundtable Discussion: Asian Studies in Asia

The Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies presents a panel discussion with Hirano Kenichiro (Professor Emeritus of Tokyo University and of Waseda University, Executive Director of Toyo Bunko), Park Hyungji (Professor of English Literature, Yonsei University), Wang Hui (Professor of Literature and History, Tsinghua University), and Zhang Longxi (Chair Professor of Comparative Literature and Translation, City University of Hong Kong). 
 
When:
March 22, 2017 4:00pm to 6:00pm
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The Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies presents a panel discussion with Hirano Kenichiro (Professor Emeritus of Tokyo University and of Waseda University, Executive Director of Toyo Bunko), Park Hyungji (Professor of English Literature, Yonsei University), Wang Hui (Professor of Literature and History, Tsinghua University), and Zhang Longxi (Chair Professor of Comparative Literature and Translation, City University of Hong Kong). 
 
This roundtable seeks to exchange ideas about the revival and reinvention of Asian Studies (Chinese studies, Japanese studies, Korean studies as well as regional and global Asian studies) as these programs are being developed at universities and research institutes across Asia. The roundtable aims to engage in a serious discussion of various Asian studies initiativse in different Asian countries in terns of their intellectual rationale and potential -- as well as the political and financial considerations and controversies that surround them.
Cost: 
Free and Open to the Public

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